Category Archives: Susan B. Anthony

The Pencil Today:

HotAirLogoFinal Thursday

THE QUOTE

“Feminism is a socialist, anti-family, political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism, and become lesbians.” — Pat Robertson

Robertson

A SUMMER NIGHT DREAM OF SMOKES, DAMES, AND JAZZ

I figure my first brush with sophistication came on a summer night in, oh, 1966, when I was ten.

The windows would be open throughout my family’s Natchez Avenue bungalow. If the wind were blowing just right, I’d be able to hear the clatter of a distant el train on the Lake Street line.

My father would be comatose in his recliner, his toes covered by his half rolled-off socks, an occasional snort emanating from his open mouth. Ma was already in bed. It’d be about 12:45am or so, and I’d be laying on the living room floor on my belly, craning my neck to see the TV screen, free as a bird.

In those summer vacation days, no matter how late I’d get to bed, I’d be sure to be able to wake up the next morning before the sun even climbed over the trees on Nagle Avenue, a block to the east. But I still had more TV watching to do. “Night Beat,” the WGN-TV late news show sandwiched between the 10:30 movie and the Late Show would be on.

Nightbeat, WGN-TV

The old anchor, Carl Greyson, would sign off and then the strains of the most adult music I ever was happy to hear would come on, the intro to that late, late movie. See, WGN would run a fairly recent movie at 10:30, something not too moth-eaten, like “Marty.” Then, after Night Beat’s house fires, shootings, and obligatory clips of Mayor Daley (the first) butchering the English language, there’d be a really old movie, often a hard-boiled detective feature from the ’40s.

For some odd reason, “The Dark Corner” sticks in my mind. Made in 1946, it starred Lucille Ball as a private eye’s hot tomato secretary who insists on helping her boss with his cases because, natch, she’s in love with him. It opens with shots of the big city, probably New York, but at that age I didn’t know the difference between The Loop and Broadway; so I dreamed of growing up and having my own office in some downtown Wabash Avenue building, where I could smoke, banter with pretty dames, and occasionally pull out my shoulder-holstered pistol just to see if it was still loaded.

Scene from "The Dark Corner"

Lucille Ball’s Got It For The Boss In “The Dark Corner”

That image gets mixed up with the intro strains of the Late Show, a jazzy thing, very subtle and smooth. A sax and a piano, mainly. In my dream it’d be playing repeatedly throughout my day in that office after I’d grown up.

It was Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five.”

That was sophistication. That’s what I had to look forward to as I reached manhood.

Brubeck

IT AIN’T MY FAULT

For a while there, nobody screamed hard-boiled Chicago like David Mamet. The author of many plays including “Sexual Perversity in Chicago,” “American Buffalo,” “The Water Engine,” “Speed-the-Plow,” and “Oleanna,” he copped a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1984 for “Glengarry Glen Ross.”

Mamet’s dialogue was the thing. Loud, profane, often (too often, some have groused) obscene, it was the dialogue of men without the company of women, men who say the word fuck again and again simply because it sounds as good as it feels to blurt out. His characters are known to converse (or, more accurately, orate past each other) in something that has come to be known as “Mamet-speak.”

The only consideration of morality in Mamet’s plays is his obvious assurance that no one is moral, merely exigent. The whole gang of office brutes in Glengarry is as likable as a pack of stray dogs.

Pack

The Original Broadway Cast

In recent years, Mamet’s stage output has fallen off and he’s turned his attention to TV commercials and cop shows. He also has decided that this holy land needs straightening out because it’s become immoral — remember, he would know immorality or the lack of it. He released a book in 2011 entitled “The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture.”

The book documents the handbasket-to-hell America has become, mainly because liberal Hollywood stars are actually press agents for some nefarious cabal, or something.

I tried to read “The Secret Knowledge” but I couldn’t get past the first three pages. It’s as hysterical as a Glenn Beck book without any of the charm. When your prose is less seductive than that of a borderline lunatic, your worldview is grim indeed. This comes as no surprise from a man for whom the effort of smiling appears agonizing.

Mamet

Mamet

Mamet this year got back on Broadway with a new play called “The Anarchist.” He lined up Patti Lupone and Debra Winger to play a radical leftist convict and a nebulous corrections department nabob, respectively. The two parry for a little more than an hour over right and wrong and those who managed to stay awake through the closing curtain reported it to be less than riveting. One reviewer called it “a short, brittle, stripped-down debate-club exercise on a stopwatch.”

And that was among the less crushing pans of the production. Accordingly, “The Anarchist” is closing after a little more than a month of performances, including 17 previews.

"The Anarchist" Marquee

And how soon will Mamet begin blaming the critics for the show’s demise (which would be like blaming a restaurant patron for suffering food poisoning)?

But isn’t that the way with the Right? Radicalized Republicans, Me Party-ists, Libertarians, and other such creatures crow about self-reliance and responsibility every chance they get but the moment they screw up they point fingers in 360º sweeps.

I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if Mamet asks for a federal bailout now.

THAT DIRTY WORD AGAIN

Mamet, like so many in the Nouveau Droit is made itchy by feminists. For instance, he battered Gloria Steinem for applying feminist criticisms to the idolatry of Marilyn Monroe. Steinem wrote that Monroe was essentially forced to play the infant and Mamet responded that Marilyn was the second coming of Madame Curie.

Mary Elizabeth Williams writes in Salon that female celebs from Katy Perry and Carla Bruni-Sarkozy to Marissa Meyer and Melissa Leo are climbing all over each other trying to proclaim to the world that they’re not feminists.

I suppose it makes sense that Perry, for one, a woman who relies upon the size of her breasts for much of her fortune, would be less than Susan B.-ish about things. But why are so many other accomplished women willing to eschew the tag, feminist?

Anthony

A Different Kind of “Firework”

Is it merely ego? As in, I did it all on my own and I never needed Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem to fight any battles for me. It reminds me of the righteous indignation of newly-muscled baseball players after they’re accused of using performance-enhancing drugs; hey, I’m good — I don’t need no stinkin’ drugs.

Yes, Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds were good. That didn’t mean they didn’t think they needed a pick-me-up now and again. Same with the female CEO of Yahoo!. Marissa Meyer is talented, sure, but she is standing on the shoulders of giants.

ASHLEY, ACTUALLY

And wouldn’t it be the coup de grace for Ashley Judd to oust jowly, humorless, and philosophically flatulent Mitch McConnell from Washington?

McConnell/Judd

Out With The Old, In With The New?

Not only would the Republicans have to rethink their stance toward Latinos, but toward women as well.

According to a number of sources, the former actress is doing her due diligence in preparing for a possible US Senate run from Kentucky.

Fingers crossed.

The Pencil Today:

THE QUOTE

“When you carry a gun, you mean to harm somebody, kill somebody.” — Bill Cosby

A LITTLE ANTHONY IN BLOOMINGTON

The stars were out yesterday afternoon in front of Williams Jewelry on Walnut Street.

Bloomington’s political heavyweights came out to dedicate an historical plaque honoring Susan B. Anthony’s appearance at the long gone Presbyterian church that once stood on the present day site of the Redmen Building.

(From Left) Kruzan, Moore, Thomas, Zietlow, & Crabtree

Mayor Mark Kruzan, City Clerk Regina Moore, County Commissioners Iris Kiesling and Julie Thomas (elect), County Prosecutor Chris Gaal, County Council members Cheryl Munson (elect), Geoff McKim and Julie Thomas, Bloomington common council member Susan Sandberg, and, of course, the grande dame of local politics, Charlotte Zietlow, all made the scene in the brilliant sunshine.

A group of some fifty citizens watched as speakers told the story of Anthony speaking at the Walnut Street church back in 1877 when she toured the country pushing for women’s suffrage.

Shirley Fitzgibbons & Cathi Crabtree Unveil the Plaque

The respective women’s commissions of Bloomington and Monroe County sponsored the plaque. The fact that Anthony spoke here only became known again in recent months. Shirley Fitzgibbons of the county commission and Cathi Crabtree of the Bloomington bunch unveiled the plaque after the pols had their say.

One sad note: Sophia Travis also worked to make the plaque a reality. After the ceremony her father offered Cathi Crabtree tearful congratulations.

QUEER REASONING

How weird is it that satire can so easily be confused with reality these days?

Case in point: The Daily Currant, an Onion wannabe, ran a piece the other day headlined, “Santorum Claims Homosexuals Stole Election.”

What looks to be about half the commenters on the piece expressed shock and revulsion that Pennsylvania’s most notable altar boy had jumped (bare)back onto his fave bandwagon — the fag monster that hides under his bed every single night of his life.

Little Rickey: Always Thinking

Dig: Santorum thinks about gays more than most gays think about gays; GOP loyalists insisted not only to the bitter end but beyond that their boy Mitt was going to win — this despite the fact that a total of zero independent polls showed him ahead; and, finally, much of the Republican reaction to Tuesday’s election at least hints that fraud was committed in the name of the secret Muslim, socialist, fascist abortionist who was granted a second term.

Ergo, the Cassock Kid coming out with a lavender-tinged conspiracy theory sounds perfectly reasonable. A story about Santorum telling CNN that homosexuals have staged a junta in this (formerly) holy land is no more ridiculous than, oh, Glenn Beck advising his flock to buy farms, pull their kids out of school, and stock up on guns in the wake of the president’s reelection.

Beck: Arm Yourselves, Real Americans!

Here’s the Daily Currant “quoting” Santorum on the “plot”:

I see the hand of the homosexual in this massive election fraud. Romney was tied or leading in most polls before the election. And then he loses? Homosexual dirty tricks. It is the only explanation that makes sense.

He goes on to accuse noted gays such as David Geffen and Elton John of having the money and the power to initiate a Mattachine overthrow.

It could have been a virus in the election machines, the Currant has him saying.

It’s all a gag — something I suspect Little Rickey knows an awful lot about.

GUN PLAY

Oh, and speaking of guns, you had to know this was coming: Gun sales have gone through the roof since Tuesday.

Gone Shoppin’

Barack Obama’s reelection seems to have caused millions of pot-bellied white men to believe their genitalia are shrinking. That’s my take on the gun sales surge.

“Experts” claim jes’ plain folks are snapping up the artillery because they fear Obama will crack down on gun ownership. The problem is, they did the same thing after he was elected in 2008 and Obama did absolutely nothing about guns during his first term.

The dwindling population of pasty-faced reactionaries who still can’t believe a brown man is their leader are arming themselves to the teeth because they honestly fear that, as a soon-to-be minority, they’ll be discriminated against, forced to live in ghettos, and denied equal rights under the law.

Makes sense. After all, that’s the way they‘ve always treated minorities.

The only events listings you need in Bloomington.

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

CLASS ◗ Dagom Gaden Tensung Ling MonasteryIntroductory course on Buddhism; 10pm

FAIR ◗ Holiday InnBloomington’s Spirit Fair, Consult with psychics & tarot readers, Shop for New Age objects, Booths for numerology, astrology, reiki, crystal healing, and palmistry; Through Sunday, 10am-5pm

WORKSHOP ◗ IU Mathers Museum of World CulturesCherokee basket weaving; 10am-4pm

CELEBRATION ◗ Trained Eye Arts CenterThe Big One: Trained Eye Arts 1-year Anniversary, Featuring live music, games, performers, studio open house; Noon

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallMaster’s Recital: Nicholas Cline, composition; 1pm

OPERA ◗ IU Musical Arts Center — “Cendrillon (Cinderella),” Presented by IU Opera Theater; 2pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Auer HallDoctoral Recital: Pei-San Chiu on flute; 2pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Musical Arts Center Recital HallJunior Recital: Caleb Wiebe on trumpet; 3pm

FILM ◗ IU Cinema — “White Material“; 3pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallSenior Recital: Peter Meyer on clarinet; 3pm

ROUNDTABLE ◗ IU Poynter CenterLearning to See: Food Justice; 4pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Auer HallInternational Vocal Ensemble, Katherine Strand, director; 4pm

MUSIC ◗ Muddy Boots Cafe, NashvilleDavid Sisson; 5-7pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallDoctoral Recital: Tze-Ying Wu on viola; 5pm

TRIBUTE ◗ Buskirk Chumley TheaterUnlikely Bedfellows: Sophia Travis’ Art of Life; 5:30-7pm

MUSIC ◗ The Player’s PubDarryl Robinson & Tim O’Malley; 6pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Auer HallBrass Choir, Edmund Cord, director; 6pm

FILM ◗ IU Cinema — “Holy Motors“; 6:30pm

STAGE ◗ IU Ivy Tech Waldron Center, Auditorium Comedy, “Alfred Hitchcock’s 39 Steps“; 7pm

FILM ◗ Bear’s PlaceRyder Film Series: “17 Girls“; 7pm

FILM & COMEDY ◗ The Comedy AtticDocumentary: “Road Comics: Big Work on Small Stages,” Performance: Stewart Huff; 7pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Auer HallGuest Recital: Kuss Quartet; 8pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Musical Arts Center Recital HallJunior Recital: Joseph Frank on cello; 8:30pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallDoctoral Recital: Tina Chong on piano; 8:30pm

MUSIC ◗ The BluebirdMatishyahu; 9pm

MUSIC ◗ The BishopShovels & Rope, Carey Murdock; 9pm

ONGOING:

ART ◗ IU Art MuseumExhibits:

  • “Paragons of Filial Piety,” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi; through December 31st
  • “Intimate Models: Photographs of Husbands, Wives, and Lovers,” by Julia Margaret, Cameron, Edward Weston, & Harry Callahan; through December 31st
  • French Printmaking in the Seventeenth Century;” through December 31st
  • Celebration of Cuban Art & Film: Pop-art by Joe Tilson; through December 31st
  • Threads of Love: Baby Carriers from China’s Minority Nationalities“; through December 23rd
  • Workers of the World, Unite!” through December 31st
  • Embracing Nature,” by Barry Gealt; through December 23rd
  • Pioneers & Exiles: German Expressionism,” through December 23rd

ART ◗ Ivy Tech Waldron CenterExhibits through December 1st:

  • “Essentially Human,” By William Fillmore
  • “Two Sides to Every Story,” By Barry Barnes
  • “Horizons in Pencil and Wax,” By Carol Myers

ART ◗ IU SoFA Grunwald GalleryExhibits through November 16th:

  • Buzz Spector: Off the Shelf
  • Small Is Big

ART ◗ IU Kinsey Institute GalleryExhibits through December 20th:

  • A Place Aside: Artists and Their Partners
  • Gender Expressions

ART ◗ IU Mathers Museum of World CulturesExhibits:

  • “¡Cuba Si! Posters from the Revolution: 1960s and 1970s”
  • “From the Big Bang to the World Wide Web: The Origins of Everything”
  • “Thoughts, Things, and Theories… What Is Culture?”
  • “Picturing Archaeology”
  • “Personal Accents: Accessories from Around the World”
  • “Blended Harmonies: Music and Religion in Nepal”
  • “The Day in Its Color: A Hoosier Photographer’s Journey through Mid-century America”
  • “TOYing with Ideas”
  • “Living Heritage: Performing Arts of Southeast Asia”
  • “On a Wing and a Prayer”

BOOKS ◗ IU Lilly LibraryExhibits:

  • The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library“; through December 15th
  • A World of Puzzles,” selections from the Slocum Puzzle Collection

ARTIFACTS ◗ Monroe County History CenterExhibits:

  • Doctors & Dentists: A Look into the Monroe County Medical Professions
  • What Is Your Quilting Story?
  • Garden Glamour: Floral Fashion Frenzy
  • Bloomington Then & Now
  • World War II Uniforms
  • Limestone Industry in Monroe County

The Ryder & The Electron Pencil. All Bloomington. All the time.

The Pencil Today:


THE QUOTE

“Men, their rights and nothing more. Women, their rights and nothing less.” — Susan B. Anthony

DONE

Things and people I hope not to hear or see for a long time:

  • “Battleground state”
  • Cokie Roberts
  • Karl Rove
  • Tagg Romney
  • The minimum half-dozen emails I got daily from the Obama campaign
  • Donald Trump
  • “Corporations are people, my friend”
  • Richard Mourdock
  • Ann Romney
  • “Binders full of women”
  • Talking to an empty chair
  • “Mittens
  • Kid Rock
  • The wrong Tony Bennett

Tonys Bennett: (l) Cool — (r) Not

  • The Ermahgerd girl
  • Rick Perry
  • Ronald Reagan
  • “…god intended…”
  • “Legitimate rape”
  • “Horses and bayonets”
  • “47 percent”

ANOTHER CHANCE

Things and people I hope to hear or see a lot in the future:

  • Shelli Yoder
  • Universal health care
  • Community
  • Gay marriage
  • Citizens United repeal
  • A woman president
  • Immigration

WOMEN

City Clerk Regina Moore was making the rounds on Election Day yesterday. She popped into the Book Corner, pumped about a fete this coming Saturday

Seems that the first women whose face graced a unit of American currency spent some time in our humble hamlet back in the 19th Century.

Susan B. Anthony, who with Elizabeth Cady Stanton set the wheels in motion for women’s suffrage, spoke at Bloomington’s old Presbyterian church 125 years ago. That church stood on Walnut Street, across from the Monroe County Courthouse and just up the block from the Book Corner.

Anthony was invited by Maude Showers, of the eponymous big Bloomington family and an early civil rights activist, to speak at the First General Convention of Women in Monroe County in the fall of 1887. Anthony spoke on November 10th and 11th at the Presby church, which stood on the plot that now is home to the Williams Jewelry, Athena gift shop, and the Redman apartments.

Go here to see the hand-drawn original plat for the Courthouse Square block, showing the location of the Presby church.

The Bloomington Commission on the Status of Women and the Monroe County Women’s Commission together have sponsored the installation of an historical marker at the site. The plaque will be dedicated Saturday at 1pm with a reception to follow.

Who knew?

The dedication is timely considering Barack Obama just won reelection thanks in large part to a huge plurality among women voters.

I WANT TO BE AROUND

By the right Tony Bennett.

The only events listings you need in Bloomington.


Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

WORKSHOP ◗ Monroe County Public LibraryFinding Grant Opportunities and Preparing Grant Proposals; 9:30am-3pm

LECTURE ◗ IU Art MuseumNoon Talk Series: “Self-Promotion: Roman Imperial Portraits in Coins and Sculpture“; 12:15-1:15pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallMaster’s Recital: Stephanie Raby on baroque violin; 5pm

LECTURE ◗ IU Memorial Union, Oak Room — “Our Civilizing Mission,” Presented by Nicholas Harrison of Kings College London, On native Algerians who went through secondary and higher education under french colonialism; 6pm

CLASS ◗ IU Art MuseumIU Lifelong Learning: What Is a Fine Print?; 6-7:45pm

LECTURE ◗ IU Neal-Marshall Black Culture CenterAuthor and attorney Walter Echo-Hawk is the keynote speaker for National American Indian Heritage Month; 6pm

SCIENCE ◗ Rachael’s CafeBloomington Science Cafe: “Brain-Machine Interfaces: Eye Tracking,” Presented by Francisco Parada; 6:30pm

ASTRONOMY ◗ IU Kirkwood ObservatoryOpen house, Public viewing through the main telescope; 6:30pm

MUSIC ◗ Cafe DjangoTom Miller Live; 7-9pm

MUSIC ◗ Muddy Boots Cafe, NashvilleJeff Foster; 7-9pm

MUSIC ◗ Bloomington High School NorthJazz Concert, Guest soloist Tom Walsh on saxophone; 7-9pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallDoctoral Recital: Youngsin Seo on violin; 7pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Musical Arts Center, M344Five Friends Master Class Series: Judy tarling on Baroque viola and violin; 7pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Musical Arts Center, Recital HallPiano Studio Recital: Students of Lee Phillips; 7pm

PERFORMANCE ◗ Unity of Bloomington ChurchAuditions and rehearsal for Bloomington Peace Choir; 7pm

STAGE ◗ IU Halls TheatreDrama, “Spring Awakening“; 7:30pm

MUSIC ◗ Max’s PlaceOpen mic; 7:30pm

MUSIC ◗ The Player’s PubSarah’s Swing Set; 8pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Auer HallDoctoral Recital: Iura de Rezende on clarinet; 8pm

DANCE ◗ Harmony SchoolContra dancing; 8-10:30pm

MUSIC ◗ IU Ford-Crawford HallDoctoral Recital: Timothy Kantor on violin; 8:30pm

MUSIC ◗ The BluebirdDot Dot Dot; 9pm

MUSIC ◗ The BishopHoly Ghost Tent Revival, Prince Moondog; 9:30pm

ONGOING:

ART ◗ IU Art MuseumExhibits:

  • “Paragons of Filial Piety,” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi; through December 31st
  • “Intimate Models: Photographs of Husbands, Wives, and Lovers,” by Julia Margaret, Cameron, Edward Weston, & Harry Callahan; through December 31st
  • French Printmaking in the Seventeenth Century;” through December 31st
  • Celebration of Cuban Art & Film: Pop-art by Joe Tilson; through December 31st
  • Threads of Love: Baby Carriers from China’s Minority Nationalities“; through December 23rd
  • Workers of the World, Unite!” through December 31st
  • Embracing Nature,” by Barry Gealt; through December 23rd
  • Pioneers & Exiles: German Expressionism,” through December 23rd

ART ◗ Ivy Tech Waldron CenterExhibits through December 1st:

  • “Essentially Human,” By William Fillmore
  • “Two Sides to Every Story,” By Barry Barnes
  • “Horizons in Pencil and Wax,” By Carol Myers

ART ◗ IU SoFA Grunwald GalleryExhibits through November 16th:

  • Buzz Spector: Off the Shelf
  • Small Is Big

ART ◗ IU Kinsey Institute GalleryExhibits through December 20th:

  • A Place Aside: Artists and Their Partners
  • Gender Expressions

ART ◗ IU Mathers Museum of World CulturesExhibits:

  • “¡Cuba Si! Posters from the Revolution: 1960s and 1970s”
  • “From the Big Bang to the World Wide Web: The Origins of Everything”
  • “Thoughts, Things, and Theories… What Is Culture?”
  • “Picturing Archaeology”
  • “Personal Accents: Accessories from Around the World”
  • “Blended Harmonies: Music and Religion in Nepal”
  • “The Day in Its Color: A Hoosier Photographer’s Journey through Mid-century America”
  • “TOYing with Ideas”
  • “Living Heritage: Performing Arts of Southeast Asia”
  • “On a Wing and a Prayer”

BOOKS ◗ IU Lilly LibraryExhibits:

  • The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library“; through December 15th
  • A World of Puzzles,” selections from the Slocum Puzzle Collection

ARTIFACTS ◗ Monroe County History CenterExhibits:

  • Doctors & Dentists: A Look into the Monroe County Medical Professions
  • What Is Your Quilting Story?
  • Garden Glamour: Floral Fashion Frenzy
  • Bloomington Then & Now
  • World War II Uniforms
  • Limestone Industry in Monroe County

The Ryder & The Electron Pencil. All Bloomington. All the time.

%d bloggers like this: